ArchivesCategory: technique

28Jul

In this post I want to have a think about clouds in architectural photography. This isn’t going to be the “ultimate guide to clouds” but more of an exploration for both you and me. I’ve wanted to write this post for some time because clouds are very much the backdrop of any external architectural photo. And […]Continue Reading

12Nov

Horizontal lines converge just like vertical lines, but often this is just part of the natural perspective of the building getting smaller in the distance. There are however a couple circumstances where getting horizontal lines parallel is pretty important / frustrating. Here’s an example of one of those scenarios. Below is a photo of Double Monk shoe […]Continue Reading

01Apr

Ok, time for something new for the blog. What I want to do is show you a photo from a recent shoot and then explain the settings I used, where I was positioned and what time of the day it was. The idea here is to allow those of you who live near the subject […]Continue Reading

14Jan

This is the third part of a three post series on my post production workflow for architectural photography. In part one I went through five steps that included: Import Sharpening of the image set Stitching together panorama shots Merging any HDR / blending images First round selection of images In part two I started to refine the images: Adjust […]Continue Reading

17Dec

This is the second part of a three post series on my post production workflow for architectural photography. In part one I went through five steps that included: Import Sharpening of the image set Stitching together panorama shots Merging any HDR / blending images First round selection of images So at this point I have […]Continue Reading

20Nov

Hi folks. Here’s a very practical post today. It’s my basic process for selecting and developing images. On a typical project I’ll shoot somewhere between 500 and 1000 frames. Some of those are multiple shots that need to be stitched together, others are reject shots that didn’t work out. The aim is to filter this massive “data […]Continue Reading

07Aug

A while back we published a post called Getting Off Auto For Architectural Photography which explained semi automatic settings for architectural photography. In this post we’re going to expand and explain full manual settings. A couple things to note. The settings below are not that different to semi automatic settings. The real difference is that in manual […]Continue Reading

10Jul

Depth of field (DOF) is a photography term that refers to a zone in front of the camera where the image is in focus, while items before and after this zone appear blurry. The size and location of this zone changes based on several factors such as aperture, focal length of the lens and distance of […]Continue Reading

25Jun

What is Live View? It’s the option to display a preview of your shot on the LCD screen of a DSLR. This may seem like a benign feature at first because point and shoot cameras have been using this approach for a long time, but in DLSR world this technology is relatively new and still […]Continue Reading

04Jun

What we’re going to show you today is the first step in getting your camera off auto mode and setting it up for architectural photography. We’re not going to use full manual just yet and instead use a camera mode called aperture priority. This is going to allow you to control the depth of field of the photo, […]Continue Reading